TN 101

by Elizabeth Brettschneider


Anyone watching the US political debates or the news over the last year probably heard much discussion about NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement, which when enacted into law in 1993 created special economic and trade relationships for the United States, Canada, and Mexico. But not many people realize that NATFA created a special nonimmigrant visa category for Canadians and Mexicans to come to the US to work in professional-level jobs. That nonimmigrant visa is called the TN. The “T” and “N” of TN stands for Trade NAFTA. The TN permits qualified Canadian and Mexican citizens with a job offer from a US employer to seek temporary entry into the United States to engage in professional business activities.

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USCIS Expands Credit Card Payment Option for Fees

by Ashley Tighe


US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced last week that the agency will now be accepting credit card payments for forms filed and processed at USCIS Lockbox facilities. This new payment option is available for forty-one fee based forms, including most forms for both marriage-based green cards and employment-based green cards, as well as citizenship applications. Examples of these forms include Form I-130 Petition for Alien Relative, Form I-131 Application for Travel Document, Form I-140 Petition for Alien Worker, Form I-485 Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status, Form I-765 Application for Employment Authorization, Form I-90 Application to Replace Permanent Resident Card, and Form N-400 Application for Naturalization.

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Year of the Dog

by Joseph McKeown


Lunar New Year decorations at Singapore Changi Airport. Hi, doggy!

Lunar New Year decorations at Singapore Changi Airport. Hi, doggy!

It's the Lunar New Year! Today marks the first day of the Lunar New Year celebrations for millions across the world and ushers in the Year of the Dog. Those born in the Year of the Dog, the eleventh of all zodiac animals, are known for being "independent, sincere, communicative and loyal." Revelers have many chances to celebrate the Lunar New Year in New York City, from firecrackers tonight in Lower Manhattan to fireside stories at Prospect Park to the annual parade on February 25, where floats, lion dancers, and drummers march through Chinatown as confetti streams everywhere. Happy Lunar New Year to all!


    The Hill: “Trump to establish National Vetting Center for immigrants, visitors”

    by Joseph McKeown


    President Trump signed a national security presidential memorandum last week that will establish a “National Vetting Center” to “identify potential threats to national security, border security, homeland security, and public safety.” The National Vetting Center will be run by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), together with the Justice Department, the State Department, and other intelligence agencies. These agencies must establish the center in six months, with no additional funding.

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    Identity

    by Joseph McKeown


    Left to Right: Roman Flowers, Glory, and The Reminders by Krystle Collins

    Left to Right: Roman Flowers, Glory, and The Reminders by Krystle Collins

    In honor of Black History Month, Identity features works in fiber by nine artists that explore imagery of people of the African Diaspora. The exhibit, curated by Michelle Bishop of Harlem Needle Arts and presented with the NYC Parks Ebony Society, which has helped organize the annual Black History Month exhibition at the Arsenal Gallery since 1991, presents pieces in a variety of media including embroidery, soft sculpture, quilt, and mixed media. I especially loved the inventive embroidery pieces by Krystle Collins. Located at the Arsenal building at 5th Avenue and 64th Street, the pieces have "elements of swag, spirituality, icons, music, and social justice" and "the works illustrate self-awareness, identify, motivation, and varying backgrounds and traditions that govern the artists’ lives." The exhibit is on display through February 23, 2018.


    OPINION: Those in Immigration Court Should Be Provided Legal Assistance Regardless of Ability to Pay

    by Olivia M. Scofield


    It’s a common scene in any episode of Law & Order: the detective puts the suspect’s wrists in handcuffs while reciting: “You have the right to remain silent, anything you do or say can be used against you in a court of law; you have the right to an attorney, if you cannot afford an attorney, one will be provided to you.” (Emphasis mine.) The recognizable “DUN DUN” then gongs as the show goes to a commercial break. It’d be natural to assume, then, that people in all kinds of legal proceedings should have an attorney provided to them, regardless of their ability to pay. In immigration court, however, this is not always the case, as a recent ruling by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals made clear.

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