The Atlantic: This Is Exactly What Privacy Experts Said Would Happen

by Georgina Escobar


According to a statement that the US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agency released last week, photos of travelers and their vehicle license plates snapped at a US border control point have been hacked. In an email statement to journalists, CBP confirmed that an undisclosed subcontractor transferred copies of license plates and travelers’ photos from federal servers to its own company network without CPB’s authorization. CBP reports that its own servers were unharmed by any cyber attack.

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5 of the Most Important Federal Agencies Involved with US Immigration

by Carolyn Szaiff Alvarez


We have previously written about the abundance of acronyms that are used by US immigration attorneys. At our office, some of those acronyms we use most frequently include: USCIS, CBP, DHS, DOS, and DOL, all of which happen to be five of the most important federal agencies involved in US immigration. (Immigration & Customs Enforcement—i.e., ICE—also has a large impact on some US immigrants, but our firm does not often work with this agency.) In this post, we provide a brief introduction to five of the federal agencies we work with most often, explain their areas of oversight, and how they are related.

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The New York Times: “U.S. Requiring Social Media Information From Visa Applicants”

by Georgina Escobar


A State Department policy effective May 31, 2019, now requires visa applicants to the United States to submit information about social media accounts they have used in the past five years. The account information requested would give the government access to photos, locations, dates of birth, dates of milestones, and other personal data commonly shared on social media.

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USCIS Will Reject I-129 Petitions Without Petitioner’s or Applicant’s Primary US Office Address

by Joseph McKeown


Effective August 5, 2019, USCIS will begin rejecting Form I-129, Petition for a Nonimmigrant Worker, petitions that do not include the petitioner’s or applicant’s name and primary US office address in Part 1 of Form I-129. Currently, USCIS rejects Form I-129 for several reasons which may include lack of signature, incorrect fees, or unauthorized third party signing on behalf of the petitioner.  USCIS notes: “DHS regulations require every form to be submitted in accordance with the form instructions, and allow USCIS to reject any benefit request that is not filed in compliance with the regulations governing the specific benefit request.”  

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Mother Jones: "Trump Gets Rid of His Most Effective Immigration Enforcer"

by Joseph McKeown


Lee Francis Cissna resigned as the director of the US Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) effective June 1, 2019, after President Trump asked him to step down. President Trump’s removal of Cissna has confused anti-immigration hardliners, since during Cissna’s tenure at the agency he has led efforts to make legal immigration more difficult. 

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